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Middle School Staff

Middle School Staff

Leadership

Janna Tsimprea

Principal

Serge Andre

Dean of Humanities &

7th Grade

Michelle Barrera

Dean of STEM &
6th Grade

Candace Fuller

Director of Instructional Support /
Dean of 8th Grade

Sixth Grade

Janice Bligen

ELA Teacher

Roseanne Roberts

Math Teacher

Ryan Chappell

Science Teacher

Catherine Salvatore

Supporting Services Teacher

Malik Bailey

Teacher Assistant

Seventh Grade

Shaz'men Whitehurst

ELA Teacher

Clifton Louison

Math Teacher

Kara Swallow

Science Teacher

Ciara Chappell

Supporting Services Teacher

David Stutt

Math Intervention

Eighth Grade

Sabrina Jones

ELA Teacher

Tiffany Biggs

Math Teacher

Marcus McLean

Science Teacher

Yaritza Lopez

Supporting Services Teacher

Specials team

Uniquea Bowers

Life Skills Teacher

Tizjana Fejzullaj

Art Teacher

Nina Lacaprara

Physical Education &
Health Teacher

Nadesha Williams

Intervention Teacher

ADDITIONAL STUDENT SUPPORT

Jessica Orapallo

Social Worker

Kat Mignocchi

Social Work Intern

Ryan McAlonan

Social Work Intern

Operations, Data, AND Afterschool

Ruth Alexandre

Director of Operations

Joel Celestin

Operations Manager

Jamilah Nixon

School Aide

Ezron Quammie

School Aide

Anthony Bhimsain

Data Analyst
All Campuses

Ashley Peters

Director of Afterschool &

Community Partnerships

Board

Nancy Lewson Kurz
Board Chair and CEO
Beginning with Children

Michelle Brooks
Senior Director, Treasurer
Chobani

Chris Gaulin
HealthCor Management, L.P.
Portfolio Manager

Deborah Goldfarb
Managing Director
Barclays Capital

Mychal Harrison
Senior Vice President
Deloitte CRG

Eric Hoffman
Principal
Centerbridge Partners, L.P.

Kofi N. Kankam
Co-Founder and CEO
Admit.me

Marshall King
Partner
Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP

Justin Nowell
Associate
Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz

Carol F. Reich, Ph.D (1935-2019)
Co-Founder
Beginning with Children

Joseph H. Reich
Emeritus Board Member, Co-Founder
Beginning with Children

Founders Joe and Carol Reich

The principles we were building our school on, presented something potentially huge in education reform. These principles-parental choice, freedom to operate in a manner consistent with the needs of specific children, parent involvement, longer school days and a longer school year, merit compensation for teachers-could be a game changer for children of poverty. It was the growing sense of this possibility that re-energized us and gave us the strength to push on, for as long as necessary.

We both shared a common and basic belief: families of means can afford to send their children to private schools or relocate to an affluent neighborhood where public schools have greater resources. The poor cannot. We recoiled against this injustice. We made it our own struggle.